2024 Board of Governors Minutes

January 18, 2024

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
January 18, 2024

Public notice of the time and place of the Ƶ Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the Ƶ website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Administration Office Board Room at Ƶ, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: .

Chair Rita Skiles called the Jan. 18, 2024, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with eight board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – absent
Borden – present
Buss – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – absent
Novotny – present
Pirnie – absent
Quick – present
Skiles – present                                  

POLICY ITEMS

Skiles announced the slate of officers for 2024. They are as follows:

  • Tom Pirnie, Chair
  • Linda Heiden, Vice Chair
  • Linda Aerni, Secretary
  • Roger Davis, Treasurer

MOVED BY BORDEN, SECONDED BY DAVIS to accept the slate of officers.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Because two of the officers were unable to attend the meeting, all new officers will be installed at the February meeting.

Dan Quick, Rita Skiles and Diane Keller (alternate for policy committee) were appointed as Nebraska Community College Association representatives and Jason Buss, Roger Davis and John Novotny were appointed as Enrollment and Financial Audit Committee members for 2024.

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Skiles asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Sandra Borden will review the claims prior to the Feb. 15, 2024, board meeting in Hastings.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Skiles asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for Jan. 18, 2024.
  2. Minutes of the Nov. 16, 2023, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the periods from 1 through Nov. 30, 2023, and from Dec. 1 through Dec. 31, 2023.
  4. Financial reports as of Nov. 30, 2023, and Dec. 30, 2023.
  5. Purchases:
    Columbus Parking Lot: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Heartland Concrete for $1,635,415.27 to provide all labor and material to remodel the Columbus campus parking lots.
    Furnas Architectural Bids: The College President recommends acceptance of the low percentage bid from Wilkins ADP for architectural services for the Automotive and Autobody building on the Hastings Campus.
  6. Personnel: None
  7. Information Security Policy: The purpose of the policy is to safeguard the privacy of visitors to Ƶ’s computing systems, website and applications. This covers the collection, protection and disclosure of information collected automatically and voluntarily.
  8. Ƶ Education Association: The following letter was received:
    Dear Negotiations Committee: The Ƶ Education Association requests that the Board of Governors of Ƶ take action to recognize the Ƶ Education Association as exclusive bargaining agent for the district's Full-time Faculty to begin bargaining next fall for the 2025-26 contract year. Please direct your response to the undersigned. Sincerely, Amy Stuart, ƵEA President, Ƶ Education Association

MOVED BY NOVOTNY, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Campus President Dr. Marcie Kemnitz opened the Grand Island Campus annual report by highlighting the newly opened Grand Central Café, a remodel that nearly doubled the size of the former snack bar. A Business Before Hours is planned in the morning of Feb. 29 to introduce the Grand Island community to the new café.

She also talked about the Grand Island J.E.T.T. grant project, which involves Ƶ, the City of Grand Island and Grand Island Public Schools. Its goal to is connect Grand Island to jobs, education and technical training by expanding the community’s limited transportation options to improve economic mobility.

She then introduced welding instructors Brandon Piersol and Mike Snell who shared the following information regarding early college students enrolled in the welding program:

  • Forty-one early college students are enrolled in the welding program this year. They come from area schools that include Giltner, Grand Island Senior High, Northwest, Palmer, Centura and Heartland Lutheran.
  • The students can take hands-on college welding courses while earning their high school diploma. They also can earn an associate of applied science degree along with two welding certificates and a production and manual certificate.
  • Students are offered multiple ways to continue their education at Ƶ, such as the Transition scholarship. Fifteen former early college students are enrolled at Ƶ in the welding program.
  • Students can participate in an apprenticeship program through local welding and fabrication shops. Currently, four students are working as apprentices at CNH and five former students have transitioned from their apprenticeships into full-time employment with CNH, Chief, AGI and Standard Iron.

Also addressing the board was Andrei Contreras Ramos, senior at Grand Island Senior High School, who thanked the board for giving him and other early college students the opportunity to use the welding lab to improve their skills. He said he currently works as an apprentice at Case New Holland and will be returning to Ƶ to complete his welding degree.

In addition to early college students, the instructors teach dozens of adult and traditional age students.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Naming Rights Proposal for Automotive Careers Training Center

Traci Skalberg, executive director of the Ƶ Foundation, said the foundation will be conducting a major gifts campaign in support of a new Automotive Careers Training Center at Ƶ-Hastings and a scholarship/programmatic endowment for the automotive and auto body programs. In preparation for this campaign, she asked the board to approve the naming rights schedule.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY NOVOTNY to approve the naming rights proposal for the Automotive Careers Training Center.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Candace Walton reported on Ƶ’s performance as compared to its Nebraska peers. She highlighted:

  • While the state-wide trend shows a decrease in enrollment, Ƶ's drop was smaller than the average of its peers.
  • The age distribution of students in Nebraska's community colleges has changed significantly. More younger students are enrolling, while fewer older students are attending.
  • Full-time enrollments have dropped in Nebraska's postsecondary education sectors, but part-time enrollments have risen to compensate.
  • As the enrollment of older students has decreased, so has the number of awards they have received. On the other hand, students under 25 years of age have seen an increase in the number of awards they have earned.
  • Ƶ stands out among community colleges for its high number of academic awards every year. It surpasses other colleges in this measure, showing that we are on the right track to offer what students want from their community college.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • Spring 2024 has gotten off to a cold a snowy start, with classes starting this week and free drop/add continuing for another full week. Fall semester entered up in enrollment so planning on that continuing for this coming semester as well.
  • Met with State Chamber President and Nebraska Economic Development director regarding a new state initiative that involves creating regional workforce groups following the community college boundaries.
  • Signed agreement with SOL Systems LLC for 2021 and 2022 RECs for a total of $21,251.
  • The Northeast Community College President, NCCA director and I met with the governor and his staff a couple weeks ago to share our commitment to work toward workforce development and expanded educational offerings. Answered questions regarding scheduling of programs and positive impact of dual credit programming, seeking his support for additional funding once ARPA funds expire in 2026.
  • Several NCCA president’s meetings regarding legislative changes we seek and response to other bills introduced this session.
  • Attended webinar from the White House regarding multiple federal grant and funding programs for community colleges centering on advanced manufacturing. Have shared with grants office as we continue to be successful in such opportunities.
  • Continue active participation in Heartland United Way in executive, finance, nomination and full board meetings. My six-year term ends in March 2024.
  • Attended the Columbus Fieldhouse ribbon cutting. This over $40 million investment is a great addition to the region and should provide opportunities for Ƶ in availability to athletic and wellness offerings.
  • Ƶ teams are beginning to plan for the completion of our 10-year Higher Learning Commission portfolio that will be finalized in 2024 prior to our site visit in March 2025.
  • Two faculty members and I will be attending the AACC Workforce Development Institute in New Orleans in support of two of our current grants – All Within My Hands/Metallica Scholars grant and the Microsoft Cyberskills for All grant.
  • Participated in the Nebraska Virtual Manufacturing Roundtable and a webinar from AACC regarding federal legislative priorities.
  • Nursing Dean, Dr. Pam Bales reported the 2023 NCLEX pass rates for our nursing students. The 40 LPN students had a 100% pass rate versus 87% national and 94% Nebraska pass rates. The 41 ADN students had a 91% pass rate versus 89% national and 95% Nebraska pass rates.
  • Criminal Justice Program Director Michael David reports that in 2023, several law enforcement agencies used the Crime House for training in crime scene mapping, forensics and K-9. The agencies gave great feedback and stated how much they appreciated having this resource available to them.

President’s Report, December 2023

  • Mid-term commencement was attended by 100 students from across the service area, making it the largest attendance since the ceremony was started three years ago. Over 411 degrees and diplomas were earned by 372 graduates this semester.
  • We have received tentative state aid allocation amounts using the new funding stream taking effect for 2024-2025. As expected, the planned increase should allow us to address some pending and future needs while lessening our reliance on annual cash reserves.
  • Last week, a small group from Ƶ was invited to Holdrege to look at a downtown facility that has become available. We will follow-up with additional discussions with potential Holdrege partners in January prior to bringing any formal requests to the board.
  • Ƶ’s iMec program has been selected as one of 10 finalists for a national Bellwether Award. Representatives will present our program at a national meeting in February 2024.
  • Ƶ was recognized as a Top 150 community college in the nation by the Aspen Institute which allows us to apply for a $1 million prize to be announced in 2024.
  • The Ƶ Foundation has been successful in getting several automotive and autobody business leaders to agree to be on a fundraising committee for our new facility in Hastings. Important work will continue throughout 2024.
  • Greatly enjoyed the first Ƶ Madrigal Feast held in Columbus with sold out crowds both Friday and Saturday nights and a large attendance on Sunday.
  • Attended the GI Chamber Legislative Kickoff session where the governor made several positive comments regarding Ƶ and the work community colleges do for students and area workforce needs.
  • A couple weeks ago, he was notified that he was nominated for a seat on the American Association of Community College (AACC) Board. Six presidents will be elected in February from the 11 nominations.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Skiles said there was no need for an executive session and requested a motion to adjourn.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY NOVOTNY to adjourn.

Aerni – absent
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – absent
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Skiles declared the meeting adjourned at 1:59 p.m.

February 15, 2024

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
February 15, 2024

Public notice of the time and place of the Ƶ Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the Ƶ website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Hall Student Union, Cottonwood Room, at Ƶ-Hastings, 550 S. Technical Blvd., Hastings, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: .

Chair Rita Skiles called the Feb. 15, 2024, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with 11 board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Buss – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Quick – present
Skiles – present                                  

POLICY ITEMS

Attorney Katie Sharp installed the 2024 board officers:

  • Tom Pirnie, Chair
  • Linda Heiden, Vice Chair
  • Linda Aerni, Secretary
  • Roger Davis, Treasurer

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Pirnie asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Jason Buss will review the claims prior to the March 21, 2024, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Pirnie asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for Feb. 15, 2024.
  2. Minutes of the Jan. 18, 2024, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from 1 through Jan. 31, 2024.
  4. Financial report as of Jan. 31, 2024.
  5. Purchases: None.
  6. Personnel: None.

MOVED BY BORDEN, SECONDED BY NOVOTNY to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Ƶ Foundation Report

Executive Director Traci Skalberg highlighted the following:

  • The consolidated assets of the Ƶ Foundation and Warren and Velda Wilson Foundation was $45.1 million as of June 30, 2023.
  • The foundation awarded $1,069,847 in scholarships and $1,060,434 in other support in 2022-23.
  • Future support includes the following: pledges receivable, $2,617,775; restricted gifts, $2,041,062; and Generations of Impact campaign, $12,500,000.
  • Updates were given on the Hastings, Columbus and Kearney major gifts campaigns; Pirnie Inclusive Playground; employee and yearend appeals; and community giving days.
  • Upcoming events include a ribbon-cutting ceremony for the Pirnie Inclusive Playground in Grand Island on May 1 and Pro-Am Golf Tournament on Sept. 16 at Lochland Country Club in Hastings.

Hastings Campus Report

Scott Pathway Director Brett Wells reported that the Summer Bridge was a success and that the 16 graduating Scott Scholars will be going to the Scott Foundation in Omaha for two days. The Scott Scholars from all participating institutions have been invited. He introduced the following students:

  • Jackson Neal of Lincoln is a first-year Scott Scholar who is studying heating, air conditioning and refrigeration. He said he didn’t know what he wanted to do after high school. During a tour of the Hastings Campus, he was introduced to the Scott Pathway by Wells and instructor Dale Long. He said the program has given him the opportunity to participate in activities, learn different skills, meet people he wouldn’t have otherwise met and form good relationships. The scholarship allows him to focus on the work at hand without having to worry about how to pay for the class. He will use the skills he has learned in his summer internship and then in his work.
  • Enoch Dixon of Hastings is a second-year Scott Scholar who is studying construction. He said that during his first semester at Ƶ-Hastings that he did the bare minimum to get a grade. That changed after he became a part of the first Scott Scholar group. He said the program changed his outlook on life, that he’s now motivated and cares about his education. He believes in showing up, not making excuses, holding himself to a higher standard and competing to be the best version of himself. After he graduates from Ƶ, he plans to study construction management and business at a four-year school and then open his own business.

Also addressing the board were Mary Lanning Healthcare employees Susan Meeske, chief development officer, and Carol Hamik, director of nurse recruitment. They talked about a partnership between Mary Lanning, Ƶ and Hastings Public Schools that has brought certified nursing assistant (CNA) classes to Hastings High School. CNA is a high-paying entry point to most healthcare fields.

Meeske said Phase 1 of the development plan was to raise money for an onsite lab at Hastings High School and for scholarships because it’s important that price not be a barrier to students taking the CNA class. Phase 2 will be expanding the scholarship fund and offering additional onsite college classes such as medication aide, phlebotomy technology, introduction to health sciences, medical terminology, and anatomy and physiology.

Hamik said that 10 of the 12 students who started the first CNA class in spring 2023 completed it. All 12 students who started the second class in fall 2023 completed it. This spring, HPS is offering a hybrid class in addition to the in-person class. There are 12 students in the in-person class and 10 students in the hybrid class. Four of the students in the hybrid class are interested in radiology. She pointed out that Mary Lanning currently has 11 open radiology positions.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Capital Improvement Budget

Craig Boroff gave an overview of the projects included in the capital improvement budget. The College President asked for tentative approval of the 2024-25 capital improvement budget so these projects can be started. Official approval of the budget is set for September.

MOVED BY NOVOTNY, SECONDED BY DAVIS to give tentative approval to the capital improvement budget.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Red Cloud Education Hub

Dr. Chris Waddle said 45 people showed up for a community meeting about Ƶ having more of a presence in Red Cloud. After touring a couple of different sites, the college settled on a renovated building on the northeast corner of the intersection of highways 136 and 281. The plan is to make this an educational hub that would serve Franklin and Superior in addition to Red Cloud. The 1,500 square-feet would provide space for a good-size classroom in the back and an open area in the front.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to allow the College President to enter into a lease agreement, not to exceed three years, to establish an educational hub in Red Cloud and engage in purchasing equipment and furniture and hiring necessary personnel to implement community‐driven programming.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Candace Walton presented information from the Voluntary Framework of Accountability, which gets its data from a six-year cohort (students who started in fall 2016) and a two-year cohort (students who started in fall 2020).

  • Central’s students continue to outperform IPEDs national average.
  • Central’s students who arrive with a planned program/career direction complete their program in shorter time and higher rate.
  • Evidence of the pandemic and economic changes may be appearing in the data.
  • Central’s students who are exploring higher education and transfer out achieve high success rates.
  • Student enrollment behavior has changed over the years and Central remains a flexible, reliable, and local option for our community.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • Following free drop/add, Ƶ’s spring enrollment continues to be up from Spring 2023 in both headcount and FTE.
  • NCCA Legislative Day is Wednesday, Feb. 28, at the Capitol in Lincoln. Meetings may begin as early as 7 a.m., with conclusion by noon.
  • Doug Pauley, Jerry Muller, two high school instructors and I will give a presentation on the iMec grant project as a top 10 finalist for the national Bellwether Award for innovation in workforce development. The program involves 13 high schools in our service area. Since Fall 2021, 275 students have enrolled in 433 courses with 30% attending Ƶ following high school graduation. Presentations, instructor training and/or equipment have been shared with high schools or colleges in 13 states and the District of Columbia.
  • I attended the Nebraska State Chamber meeting and Hall of Fame banquet honoring the Hornady family and Sid Dinsdale. Great showing from the Grand Island area and presentations included two related to workforce initiatives in Nebraska.
  • Faculty members Michael David and Dan Gompet and I attended the AACC Workforce Development Institute where national foundation, federal representatives and corporate partners shared ideas and efforts to collaborate resources. We were there because of the Metallica Scholars and Microsoft/Cyberskills for All grants. Many sessions regarding advanced training and education in AI, cybersecurity, early college, instructor recruitment and networking with industry reps. Hopefully the National Education Director from Snap On will visit Ƶ this summer based on this conference interaction.
  • I continue to meet with community representatives from Holdrege and Red Cloud regarding expanded or new space for Ƶ in their communities.
  • Ƶ-Columbus hosted Congressman Mike Flood’s Workforce Housing Summit with strong attendance and positive comments from the congressman and others regarding our hospitality.
  • Several Ƶ and Ƶ Foundation representatives attended the Kearney Chamber annual meeting. I interacted with Senator Ricketts who also attended the event.
  • I met with the Ƶ Foundation and representatives from multiple Omaha-based foundations this past month regarding future opportunities for funding and community development.
  • I participated in the first automotive capital campaign meeting and attended the Grand Island welding facility meeting with industry seeking feedback and input on our new facility.
  • I participated in a successful follow-up visit with ACEN, our national accreditor, and received preliminary notification of the recommendation for full reaccreditation. Final approval will not come for six months from the ACEN board, but congratulations to Dr. Pam Bales and the faculty, students, clinical partners and nursing staff who presented a detailed report, interviews and site visits to earn the preliminary recommendation.
  • I participated in the quarterly All-College Faculty Senate meeting and led the quarterly President’s Quality Action Council meeting with areawide representatives from faculty, staff, administration and students.
  • I attended Gov. Pillen’s State of the State recap in Grand Island and had interactions at the State Chamber meeting and Hall of Fame banquet.
  • I attended the Nebraska Manufacturing Advisory Council meeting held at Kiewit Hall (College of Engineering) at UNL. There are applied research and grant opportunities in engineering which Ƶ may be able to participate in along with local and state industry partners. I serve as secretary for that group.
  • I participated in the quarterly meeting of our Postsecondary International Network (PIN) of which the Ƶ Foundation and I serve as treasurer and fiscal agent. Current representatives include colleges from the United States, Canada and South Korea.
  • I participated in webinars sponsored by the National Science Foundation, Nebraska Math Readiness Project and am seeking to coordinate state support for another national apprenticeship grant with US DOL.

Updates from area vice presidents include:

  • The arts, sciences and business faculty met with peers from other Nebraska community colleges to update courses as part of the Nebraska Transfer Initiative. These meetings were hosted in Grand Island.
  • A new paraeducator certificate has been approved by Ed Services. Course design will begin this month, and promotion to local districts and ESUs will begin in March. Students who earn the certificate will be qualified for special education, Title I or early childhood programs. They will be MANDT, CPR, and Safe-with-You trained.
  • We are now offering ESL in Ord because a local employer requested it for its employees and spouses. We worked with IT to get a WebEx cart set up for students to attend a remote class from the Ord Learning Center.
  • The total number of student athletes at Ƶ this year is 129. Of these, 86 are Nebraska residents with an overall team academic GPA of 3.22 and 1,599 completed credits in the fall semester. We’re proud of our student athletes, coaches, staff and administration for these strong outcomes. To date, the teams have assisted in raising over $29,600 toward expenses.
  • Ƶ has requested to move from our current Region 9 (three colleges) to a larger Region 11. Reasons include increased competitiveness and exposure to teams we see during the year and at districts. Region 11 includes Northeast Community College (Norfolk) and several Iowa colleges with whom we compete during the regular season. If accepted, this change could happen for the 2024-25 school year.
  • We’re seeking to fill entrepreneurship director positions in both Kearney and Hastings. Strong activity continues in both Grand Island and Columbus.
  • Ƶ will participate for the first time in the Nebraska Assessment of College Health Behaviors (NACHB) Survey in Spring 2024 as part of our participation in the Nebraska Collegiate Prevention Alliance. NACHB collects data regarding substance use, student wellness and mental health concerns. Its results are provided through site-specific reports and comparison briefs highlighting differences between our students and those at other participating institutions.
  • After add/drop, 130 military-connected students are registered for the term. Veterans Resource Center Director Barry Horner recently attended the NASPA (Student Affairs Administrators in Higher Education) Military Symposium. Other Nebraska colleges attending the symposium have reached out to Barry, and reps from UNL, UNO, Central, Metro, Southeast and Northeast will be meeting to discuss what they can do for each other and how they can build a framework for smooth transitions for veterans who are transferring.
  • We received notice that the release of FAFSA data to schools won’t happen until the first part of March. This is because of the Department of Education updating tables that will result in more students being eligible for Pell Grants. This also gives the Department of Ed an extension for getting information to software providers to have systems updated. We have crafted a timeline around the release of the student record data. The goal will be to have initial financial aid offers to students by mid-April.
  • The Columbus Campus Student Engagement Office has implemented a new monthly activity series called “Adulting 101” that provides simple “fast facts” about a topic that students can take with them. February was Grocery Shopping on a Budget, March is Taxes, April is Cooking Simple Meals, and May is Making Friends When You Aren’t in College.
  • Joan McCarthy and the other Career and Employment staff have posted 125 jobs to the job board since the start of the semester.
  • Allie Remm, Grand Island Admissions, has been working on additional collaborations with the Adult Education office to ensure that Adult Education students have a plan and can see that continuing their studies is possible. We will be having a monthly visit to offer resources and support.
  • Spring semester Welcome Week activities attracted a significant turnout, with 80-100 individuals interacting daily. The week-long event provided new and returning students with opportunities to connect, explore campus resources, and participate in various activities. Additionally, Student Success hosted a Community Resource Fair with 100-120 students engaging with various community organizations and resources. This event facilitated connections between students and valuable community services, fostering a sense of belonging and support.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Pirnie requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues at 3:18 p.m.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY NOVOTNY that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 3:44 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY BORDEN, SECONDED BY HEIDEN to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie declared the meeting adjourned at 3:45 p.m.

March 21, 2024

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
March 21, 2024

Public notice of the time and place of the Ƶ Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the Ƶ website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Administration Office Board Room at Ƶ, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: .

Vice Chair Linda Heiden called the March 21, 2024, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with nine board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Buss – present
Cowan – absent
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – absent
Quick – present
Skiles – present

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Heiden asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Sam Cowan will review the claims prior to the April 18, 2024, board meeting in Grand Island.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Heiden asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for March 21, 2024.
  2. Minutes of the Feb. 15, 2024, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from 1 through Feb. 29, 2024.
  4. Financial report as of Feb. 29, 2024.
  5. Purchases:
    Phelps Building abatement: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Environmental services for $21,960.00 to provide all labor and material to abate the Phelps building on the Hastings Campus.
    Construction Town House Realtor: This project consists of requesting bids from qualified vendors to provide the college realtor services to sell the construction program townhome located at 3113 and 3115 W Kux Drive, Hastings, NE. The College President recommends North Shore Real Estate for realtor service.
    Hastings Campus Flowerbed Maintenance: The College President recommends acceptance of the sole bid of $64,936 from Lawnscape for tree and flowerbed maintenance and chemical application at the Hastings Campus.
  6. Personnel:
    Policy Updates: Changes to the benefits and holidays policies and to the military leave procedure and policy.
  7. Red Cloud Lease: The commercial three-year lease agreement between Ƶ and 402 Loft LLC will allow Ƶ to rent 2,170 square-feet of space in a building at 402 N. Webster in Red Cloud to provide educational programming. This will be referred to as an education hub versus an official learning center.

MOVED BY BUSS, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Health Sciences Report

  • Pam Bales and second-year student Teri Gerhardus shared about the Blessed Sacrament Preschool tour. Tour has been happening for nearly 10 years and Gerhardus had her own children attend the fair when they were in preschool. The tour allows children to learn handwashing and other skills, use a stethoscope and check a pulse. It is a highlight of the year for the nursing students.
  • Bales also shared about the Nursing and Health Sciences Career Fair held last month at College Park. A very rewarding experience for both attendees and employers who were present. In addition to employers, six RN to BSN programs Ƶ has articulation agreements with were present.
  • 2024-25 cohort. Letters going out now with hopes of full cohorts on all campuses/centers where nursing offered.
  • ACEN site visit in February went well. Conditions were removed to allow for continuation of the program.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Tuition, Fees, Food and Housing Rates for 2024-25

Joel King said the cost of tuition, fees, food or housing will remain the same as the previous year. Those rates are tuition, $96 per credit hour; fees, $16 per credit hour; housing, $3,354 per semester for single occupancy and $1,677 for double or triple occupancy; and food, $7,476 for the 14-meal plan for two semesters and $8,192 for the 19-meal plan for two semesters.

Early College students will also pay the same rates for 2024-25. They’ll pay from $0 to $96, depending on the high school’s ability to cover instructional costs. All students will be charged a fee of $16 per credit hour.

MOVED BY NOVOTNY, SECONDED BY BUSS to approve the tuition, fees, food and housing rates for 2024-25.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Employee Wages and Benefits

Joel King made the following wage and benefits for 2024-25:

  • Full-time classified and contracted employees retained for the 2024-25 year will be eligible to receive a wage increase. An amount up to the equivalent of 4.0% of total wages will be set aside for compensation.
  • Employees hired after May 31, 2024, or salaried employees who exceed the current maximum rate for their grade will not be eligible for an increase. Salaried employees who will exceed the maximum rate as a result of the increase will be adjusted to the maximum rate. Hourly employees who have exceed their maximum rate for their grade will still be eligible for an increase of 2.0% of their current rate.
  • Employees eligible to receive additional vacation days due to longevity may have the opportunity to get those additional days paid out in 2025.
  • Health and dental insurance premiums are estimated to increase 1.99% over the next year. This equates to an increase of approximately $180,859.
  • Dependents of eligible employees can apply to have $1,152 per semester applied to available on-campus housing costs in lieu of taking their tuition reimbursement.
  • All other benefits will remain in place without change.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to accept the wages and benefits for full-time salaried and classified staff for 2024-25.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Bookstore Bids

This project consists of requesting bids from qualified vendors to provide the college with a management solution for campus bookstore and retail services delivered to the college. These services include textbook pricing and affordability, online ordering capabilities, customer service, experience and adoptions, course material, marketing, financial aid compliance, financial reporting, textbook returns, implementation, and locations of operations.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY QUICK to accept Barnes & Noble as the college bookstore for the college.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Crime House Naming Rights

Ƶ Foundation Executive Director Traci Skalberg requested the board grant Hornady Manufacturing Company the naming rights for the crime house at the Grand Island Campus. In honor of its 75th anniversary this year, the company also plans to establish a Criminal Justice Program Scholarship Fund that will be managed by the Ƶ Foundation.

MOVED BY AERNI, SECONDED BY SKILES to grant the crime house naming rights to Hornady Manufacturing Company in Grand Island.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Shooting Sports Proposal

Athletics Director Mary Young presented a proposal to start a clay target-shooting program at the Hastings Campus. This is an emerging sport within the NJCAA that is open to all age groups and skill levels. The Raider Athletic Department at the Columbus Campus will manage the clay target shooting sports compliance, eligibility, and code of conduct. The initial goal is to have a 10-member squad with two five-member teams.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY AERNI to expand Ƶ athletics to include clay target shooting sports at the Hastings Campus.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Dr. Walton introduced Dr. Amy Mancini and Tiffany Hunt to report on the Nebraska Math Readiness Project.

  • The project is in its sixth year, increasing from 21 students in 2018 to 360 this year.
  • Ten new schools in the 25-county service area were added this year.
  • 192 students from the completers list have enrolled in at least one for-credit course at Ƶ. 42 individual students earned 115 awards at Ƶ, most notably welding and diesel technology.
  • Participation in the project is free due to private donor support, saving families $191,000+ in tuition to date by getting students math ready in high school versus having to take remedial math courses in college.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • Three Ƶ employees and I participated in a two-day celebration of graduates hosted by the Suzanne and Walter Scott Jr. Foundation in Omaha. Sixteen Scott Scholars from Ƶ were recognized from our first class of graduates. They attended the event with other Scott Scholars from Metro Community College, Notre Dame, Creighton, UNO, Hastings College and Colorado State University. Over 70 applications have been received for selection of the new 2024-26 cohort.
  • Held several meetings regarding the cumulative positive results and continuation planning for the Nebraska Math Readiness program that is reaching several hundred students struggling with high school math in the Ƶ service area.
  • Met Senator Ricketts for an open forum he conducted on the Ƶ-Columbus campus.
  • Three other Ƶ representatives and I attended and presented our pitch for the Futures Assembly Community College Bellwether Award in Workforce Development. While we did not win, we still placed in the top 10 nationally and learned about many other best practices from across the country to share or replicate at Ƶ.
  • Appreciated Dan Quick and Chris Waddle representing Ƶ at the NCCA state legislative day to meet with senators and educate them on the positive work of our institutions and answer questions regarding upcoming legislation.
  • Signed a letter of intent and am now planning a community meeting in Holdrege regarding a potential new downtown site that would allow for expansion of programming as well as community partnerships.
  • Heard and viewed updates on the Rural Health Building with Ƶ/UNK/UNMC. Good progress being made with professional facilities being built in that community to help us expand our nursing numbers in the Kearney area.
  • Completing my six years of service with the Heartland United Way board this month but am still busy with board, agency and committee meetings this past month.
  • Participated as the training providers representative in the committee and board meeting of the Greater Nebraska Workforce Development Board, which was hosted over two days at Ƶ-Hastings.
  • Attended the Grand Island Chamber of Commerce dinner along with others from Ƶ and the Ƶ Foundation.
  • Although not successful on the ballot for a position on the board of AACC, will be attending the annual conference in April. AACC invited me (as one of 20 presidents) to attend a 7000+ attendee Artificial Intelligence conference (ASU+GSV Summit). This summit will explore technology solutions and access from “Pre-K to Gray.”

Updates from area vice presidents include:

  • Nursing assistant, medication aide and emergency medical services programming has continued to see demand and inquiries for more offerings in local high schools. Continued growth in EMS seems to drive the need for the paramedicine growth we been seeing.
  • May 1 will be the ribbon cutting for the Pirnie Inclusive Playground at Ryder Park in Grand Island. Gotschall grandchildren have been testing it out with unanimous support and excitement.
  • The Nursing/Heath Sciences Career Fair was held at College Park on Feb. 28. There was outstanding participation with 48 employers, four college/universities, and 220 students in attendance. In addition to nursing students, students from occupational therapy assistant, paramedicine, medical technology, medical assistant and pharmacy tech programs attended.
  • Business administration has been busy recruiting. In the last two months, the faculty have shared information about the programs with almost 1,000 prospective students from six different schools.
  • Early Childhood Education will incorporate behavior management (MANDT) training into the education practicum, saving districts money and making the paraeducator certificate highly marketable.
  • Amy Mancini, dean of arts, science and business, conducted two “Using AI in the office” webinars as part of the employee training series that Ƶ hosts on one Friday per month. Two faculty members are partnering to design a personal development course with a focus on ethical use of artificial intelligence (AI) in school and at work.
  • The new XR/Virtually Reality lab on the Columbus Campus has continued to see strong and varied uses, including animal cell and bacteria cell activity, Black History Month event, theater’s virtual tour of the Anne Frank house, and physics and nursing labs.
  • Financial aid cycle I scholarship application closed on March 1. We ended up with 988 submitted applications and 318 who had started the application but did not finish/submit the application. Those non-completers were reached out to and will be a group targeted for cycle II.
  • The Columbus Campus admissions department will host 375 eighth graders on March 27 for a college visit. The Kearney Center Student Success and Enrollment Management staff recently hosted a group tour from KHS, with over 400 9th graders touring the center.
  • In February, the Hastings career and employment services department witnessed a notable surge in our Job Board activity with the addition of 22 new employers and a total of 146 job postings. Additionally, our efforts in student engagement resulted in 76 new student registrations with the Job Board and 28 students adding their resumes to it.
  • Nebraska Land Improvement Contractors Association (NLICA) conference held its annual conference in Kearney on Jan. 18 and awarded scholarships to our heavy equipment operator (HEOT) students. We appreciate their continued support of our HEOT students each year!
  • Multiple industry advisory board meetings were or will be held this spring. Examples include agriculture, March 1; information technology and services, March 5; hospitality management and culinary arts, March 25; and media arts, March 27.
  • Nebraska Blacksmiths, Welders and Machinists Association met for the 2024 Short Course Program on the Columbus Campus on Jan. 9. Led by WELD faculty Bryce Standley and Landon Hunt, participants learned about laser welding, silicone bronze welding, and Hypertherm cutting applications. The group also took a tour of Valmont Industries.
  • Over 1500 area high school agriculture students competed in district FFA contests on the Columbus, Hastings and Grand Island campuses with contests coordinated by high school and Ƶ faculty and staff.
  • Ƶ welding students Aiden Bock (1st), Levi Gillming (5th) and Matthew Gleeson (6th) placed well in a Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) invitational welding competition at North Central Technical College in Beloit, Kansas.
  • The Columbus welding program has completed two stoves for the international Salma Stove project with an additional three in progress. The faculty are hoping the current three will be completed by the end of the month. Plans are for a shipment overseas sometime in April.
  • Ƶ will be partnering with UNL to offer summer professional development workshops. They include 12 unique sessions and 13 offerings. Online registration will open on April 2. The schedule is placed in spring packets for area counselors and sent electronically through the state listserv to instructors and contacts we work with throughout our service area.
  • Sam Matticks, the new Ƶ-Kearney automotive program instructor, continues to do well with classes and with enrollment resulting in 58 students recently completing a course. Sam is also working on the potential donation of an automotive hoist from NAPA Auto Parts.
  • A Nursing Camp will be held June 2-5. The camp is for students entering seventh and eighth grades and limited to 15 students. The community and workforce education and nursing department are involved.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

No executive session needed

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY BORDEN, SECONDED BY NOVOTNY to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – absent
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Heiden declared the meeting adjourned at 2:21 p.m.

April 18, 2024

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
April 18, 2024

Public notice of the time and place of the Ƶ Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the Ƶ website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held in the Administration Office Board Room at Ƶ, 3134 W. Highway 34, Grand Island, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: .

Chair Tom Pirnie called the April 18, 2024, meeting to order at 1 p.m., with 11 board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – present
Borden – present
Buss – present
Cowan – present
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Novotny – present
Pirnie – present
Quick – present
Skiles – present

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Pirnie asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Roger Davis will review the claims prior to the May 16, 2024, board meeting in Kearney.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Pirnie asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for April 18, 2024.
  2. Minutes of the March 21, 2024, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from March 1 through March 31, 2024.
  4. Financial report as of March 31, 2024.
  5. Purchases:
    Landscaping and irrigation, Kearney: The College President recommends accepting the bid of $34,000.00 from Tilley Sprinklers & Landscaping to complete the turfgrass and irrigations for the college at the Kearney Center.
    Table replacement, Ord: This project consists of replacing tables at the Ord Center to improve seating options and allow the staff to move furniture for various events without additional assistance. The current tables do not fold up or have wheels. The College President recommends accepting pricing in the amount of $32,597.40 from Duet Resources.
    Welding Lab floor replacement, Columbus: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from BD construction for $104,000.00 to provide all labor and material to refinish the welding floor on the Columbus Campus.
    Fiber system expansion, Hastings: The College President recommends acceptance of the low acceptable bid from Commonwealth electric for $2,293,000.00 to provide all labor and material to expand the fiber on the Hastings Campus.
  6. Personnel: None
  7. 2024-25 Ƶ calendar: The calendar was amended to add the Juneteenth holiday.

MOVED BY COWAN, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Career and Technical Sciences Report

Dr. Nate Allen, dean of career and technical sciences, gave an overview of the division, which includes 20 programs. He introduced people to share information about two of those programs: media arts and diesel technology.

Media arts instructors Beth Kavan and Dani Schwinn highlighted the following about their program:

  • They teach graphic design, social media, broadcasting, photography, video production and media writing.
  • Their students gained real-world experience doing product photography for the Bee Kind body care company, designing an informational brochure for the League of Women Voters, doing event photography for the Father Daughter Ball at Lochland Country Club and designing the annual campus report for the Hastings Campus.
  • This year’s annual art show was the largest many years with 30 individual pieces by 15 graphic design and photography majors.
  • Media arts student Lauren Matthies of Hastings talked about helping with the arts show, which in turn helped her prepare for her own exhibition. She attended Doane University for two years before coming to Ƶ, which she said has much more hands-on learning.

Diesel technology instructors Justin Curtis and Raece Paulson highlighted the following about their program:

  • All five instructors, which also include Randy Manning, Jeff Bexten and Josh Leth, are Ƶ alumni who have worked in industry.
  • Diesel technology is in high demand. In the past year, 388 open diesel jobs were posted on Ƶ’s online job board. Right now, there are 58 job postings.
  • This year’s Diesel Days drew 144 high school students and 35 companies from Nebraska and all the surrounding states.
  • Companies are investing in Ƶ’s diesel students through formal sponsorships, reimbursement sponsorships and sign-on bonuses. They also provide the college with software access and equipment such as engines and transmissions.
  • Diesel technology student Logan of Grand Island is sponsored by Titan, where he started working after high school. He said that’s when he started realizing what he was getting into but thinks he’ll do great in the profession. To pay back Titan’s sponsorship, he signed on to work for three years at the company following his graduation from Ƶ.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

No items were presented.

REPORTS

Student Success Report

Fran Davis, institutional research coordinator, presented the following information about the 2023 employer survey:

  • The survey is sent via SurveyMonkey to employers who have hired Ƶ graduates or who signed up for Ƶ’s job board in the last two years. Of the 1,063 invitations sent, 454 responded for a 23.1% response rate.
  • Survey respondents rated 19 professional skills as well as program-specific technical skills.
  • Those who have hired a Ƶ graduate in the last two years rated their skill level as 17% advanced, 49% proficient, 26% progressing and 8% beginning. Those who haven’t hired a Ƶ graduate in the last two years rated the listed skills as 53% very important, 38% important, 8% somewhat important and 1% not important. By comparing these two sets of responses, Ƶ can determine if it’s on target in teaching the general skill sets most needed by employers.
  • The survey showed that 95% of employers were very satisfied/satisfied with the overall preparation of Ƶ graduates and with their own experience on a Ƶ Program Advisory Committee. Employers who weren’t on an advisory board were asked if they wanted to join one, with 81% responding “yes.” The survey also showed that 98% of employers would consider hiring Ƶ graduates in the future.
  • Survey results are used in Assessment of Student Learning (ASL) plans, annual program reviews, Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education seven-year program reviews, Graduate Outcome Report and the National Community College Benchmarking Project.

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following updates from area vice presidents:

  • Counseling Services had nine new intakes in March and 96 kept appointments. Counselors saw a decrease of four crisis sessions in March compared to 14 sessions completed in February 2024.
  • There continues to be significant delays and errors in student aid processing at the federal level. Ƶ is updating and adjusting award notices and keeping in regular contact with students and parents. Records have been received from over 1,200 students, but errors and omissions are being identified and corrected at both local and federal levels.
  • Since January 2024, Disability Services has had 104 student appointments, of which 56 ae new students to our services.
  • In March, Career and Employment Services added 22 new employers and 139 job listings. Additionally, 36 students registered on the platform, with 10 students uploading their resumes. The online job board boasts 2,311 employers, 812 students, and 1616 alumni registered.
  • ACTIONS Day on March 20 brought over 600 high school students to the Hastings Campus.
  • March outreach efforts for veteran students yielded positive results. One hundred twenty-six students who haven’t registered or graduated since the 2003 spring term were identified and contacted. We got close to 5% of these students registered for either summer or fall.
  • May 1 will be the ribbon-cutting day for the Pirnie Inclusive Playground at Ryder Park in Grand Island.
  • The Occupational Therapy Assistant program has 14 students attending our state association conference in Kearney on April 6, the most attendees from any OT or OTA program. Instructor Libby Paro will present at the conference.
  • Automotive instructor Nick Kelley was awarded the Dale Parnell Faculty Excellence Award at the American Association of Community Colleges conference in Louisville, Ky.
  • Ƶ’s paramedicine program received reaccreditation letter, good until 2029.
  • On March 9, 2024, paramedicine adjunct faculty member Denell Rhinehart was awarded the Nebraska Emergency Medical Services Association (NEMSA) Chuck Woll Memorial Instructor of the Year. She is now being nominated for the National Association of EMT’s (NAEMT) EMS Educator of the Year.
  • Vanessa Crookshank, adjunct dental hygiene instructor, spoke on artificial intelligence at the International Dental Hygiene Educator’s Forum, “Building Digital Literacy: The Foundation for Utilizing Artificial Intelligence in Education.” She also spoke on artificial intelligence at the American Dental Education Association Conference in New Orleans.
  • The Ƶ Dental Hygiene program completed its first restorative workshop with six registered dental hygienists from the community. They will sit for their clinical boards on March 22 here at Ƶ, the first educational institution in Nebraska to hold this workshop.
  • A grant has been submitted in cooperation with Columbus Community Hospital to update its health simulator and an agreement will be updated on expectations for use by students and employees.
  • Ƶ is working closely with St. Francis Medical Center in Grand Island regarding nursing clinicals and additional students there since Creighton University has discontinued its academic program at the center.
  • The 2024-25 fall first-year nursing cohort will have 40 students in Grand Island, 30 students in Kearney and 23 students in Columbus.
  • Business faculty completed an employer survey to help guide our program revision. The results from 50 participants will be discussed by our Laddering and Awards subcommittee. We will have recommended changes to awards by May 16.
  • Biology faculty have collaborated to create an exam for “Credit by Exam” for BIOS 1010. Some students have requested this to fulfill their prerequisite for A&P I. They have created administration and scoring rules as well.
  • Math faculty are hosting a webinar in April to promote the Math Success Lab utilizing same software shared with the hoard last month.
  • Beginning this summer, instructors Brandon Bender and Michelle Konen will collaborate on writing a new personal development AI (Artificial Intelligence) course.
  • Adult Education staff partnered with Burlington English to hold a teacher in-service on March 7, and it was a big hit. We reviewed the “why” behind the changes that were made to CASAS testing this year, prepped for additional changes next year, and explored how we can better help our students identify and obtain their goals.
  • Athletic Director Mary Young will be attending the NJCAA Convention in Charlotte, N.C., in April as the NCJAA Senior Women’s Administrator to the Board of Regents with responsibilities to female sports committees. She won a 2023-24 George E. Kilian Award of Excellence!
  • All offices in the Grand Island entrepreneurship center have been leased out effective April 1. First Partnering for Area Entrepreneurship is an action plan to grow area entrepreneurship. The first meeting has 15 attendees (SBA, SourceLink NE, Grow GI, VR, RPN EXT, GI Chamber, GIEDC, NE Ext., NE Enterprise Fund, Hall Co. EXT, Valid). Smaller groups will meet quarterly, and work on the local Entrepreneurship Action Plan and other identified areas of growth. The Grand Island Chamber will include us in their media press release in April. The center is included in a downtown development tour for April. Upcoming NE Tech collaborative to visit Grand Island., panel discussion, podcast at the center.
  • Over 80 adults from the Columbus area signed up for a Ƶ-sponsored tour to Grand Island area businesses on April 10 and 11. Great excitement of these local shared events.
  • The Media Arts (MART) exhibit, "Small Towns, Big Ideas," was held on March 3 and drew a record-breaking crowd to see the over 30 pieces by 15 talented students.
  • Selection of the third cohort of Scott Scholars started on March 4. Interviews for the third cohort selection occurred on March 11 and 12. Twenty-six Scott scholars were selected for the next cohort.
  • The Hastings Information Technology & Systems (INFO) Advisory Committee met on March 5 via WebEx.
  • Automotive Days on March 27 on the Hastings Campus provided the opportunity for 88 high school students, 12 vendors from industry and current Ƶ AUTO students to explore program and career opportunities that lie ahead.
  • Agriculture, diesel technology and heavy equipment operator faculty, Alison Feeney and Brian Hoffman hosted a Ƶ booth at the Nebraska State FFA Convention on April 3 and 4.
  • The Nebraska SkillsUSA State Leadership Conference and Competitions was held April 11-13. Ƶ’s Grand Island and Hastings campuses hosted select competitions in addition to the competitions held in Grand Island at Fonner Park. Ƶ had close to 85 students registered to participate and complete.
  • The criminal justice program is celebrating a $750,000.00 donation from the Hornady in honor of the company’s 75th anniversary. A dedication ceremony for naming of the Hornady Crime House is being held on Thursday, April 18, featuring the unveiling of new signage. Michael David, program director, and the Ƶ Foundation staff have been collaborating to organize the event.
  • The Columbus welding program has completed three more stoves for the Salma Stove project, bringing the total number to five. These stoves have been picked up and are expected to ship out sometime in April.
  • Agriculture instructors Wade Hilker and Chase Janssen led students on tours of agriculture industries and to the Oklahoma Youth Expo March 19-22. Students toured SEK Genetics and Cloning Facility in Galesburg, Kan.; Express Ranches in Yukon, Okla.; and Sunglo Feeds and Manufacturing in El Reno, Okla.
  • Eron Baker, hospitality management and culinary arts director, met with eight area schools last month, serving various arrangements from gourmet lunches and Friday Fish n Chips to Baja Blast Rolled Ice Cream.
  • The electrical technology certificate program in Kearney continues to grow under the leadership of adjunct instructor Jeff Mashek. The program recently purchased tool kits to aid in the hands-on learning of students. It also has been building strong connections with industry.

Diana Watson, Ƶ international studies coordinator, gave a short report on an upcoming trip coordinated by the statewide consortium of community colleges that promotes international education. From Ƶ, faculty member Dr. Susan McDowall and 12 students will be traveling to Italy, which will include visiting Milan and Florence, learning how to make parmesan cheese in Parma and taking a historical walking tour in Bologna, among many other things. Future trips are being planned to Ireland for criminal justice students, and to Costa Rica trip for TRiO students.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Pirnie requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues at 2:18 p.m.

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY DAVIS that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie proposed a recess at 2:30 p.m. for completion of a report.

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY AERNI that the Board of Governors recess the executive meeting for report completion.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie asked to reconvene the executive session at 3:10 p.m.

MOVED BY NOVOTNY, SECONDED BY COWAN that the executive meeting reconvene.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 3:24 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY QUICK to adjourn.

Aerni – aye
Borden – aye
Buss – aye
Cowan – aye
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – aye
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie declared the meeting adjourned at 3:25 p.m.

May 16, 2024

CENTRAL COMMUNITY COLLEGE
Board of Governors’ Meeting Minutes
May 16, 2024

Public notice of the time and place of the Ƶ Board of Governors' meeting was given in advance to the board members, college administrators and the five daily newspapers within the 25-county area. The agenda was available to the public in the college president’s office and on the Ƶ website, www.cccneb.edu. The college adheres to the Open Meetings Act, a copy of which is available in the college president’s office.

The meeting was held at Ƶ-Kearney, 1215 30th Ave., Kearney, Nebraska.

All supplemental documents from this meeting are available at: .

Chair Tom Pirnie called the April 18, 2024, meeting to order at 1:08 p.m., with seven board members present.

ROLL CALL

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – present
Cowan – absent
Davis – present
Heiden – present
Keller – present
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – present
Quick – present
Skiles – present

INTRODUCTION OF GUESTS

Pirnie asked college representatives to introduce guests and staff members.

REVIEWING CLAIMS FOR NEXT MEETING

Linda Heiden will review the claims prior to the June 20, 2024, board meeting in Grand Island.

Public Participation

Pirnie requested that members of the audience register with Scott Miller if they wanted to address the board during the Public Participation segment.

REQUEST FOR DISCUSSION OF CONSENT ITEMS

Pirnie asked board members for items in the consent agenda they would like to move to discussion of consent/action items.

Roger Davis asked for Parental Leave be moved to the discussion of consent/action items.

CONSENT ITEMS

Consent items included:

  1. Agenda for May 16, 2024.
  2. Minutes of the April 18, 2024, Board of Governors meeting.
  3. Claims for the period from April 1 through April 30, 2024.
  4. Financial report as of April 30, 2024.
  5. Purchases:
    Nursing simulator: The College President recommends purchase of the simulator for the nursing program at the Columbus Campus.
    Community education brochures: The College President recommends acceptance of the quote from Midwest Connect in the amount of $52,528.00 for the printing and mailing of the community education brochures.
    Washers and dryers for the dorms: The College President recommends accepting pricing from Jetz Service Company Inc. for the student dorms on the Columbus and Hastings campuses.
  6. Personnel: None
  7. Parental leave: Moved to Discussion of Consent/Action Items
  8. Conflict of interest: It is the intent of the Board of Governors to avoid conflicts of interest concerning actions that may be construed as inappropriate due to special interests represented on the board or any employee of Ƶ.
  9. Kearney E-ship Center: The proposed lease agreement is with the Nebraska Department of Administrative Services, State Building Division, for 182 square-feet of office space in the Kearney Entrepreneurship Center, 319 W. 11th St. The lease would run from May 17, 2024, to April 30, 2025, at a rate of $18 per square-foot.
  10. 2025-26 and 2026-27 college calendars.
  11. November meeting date change: The College President requests approval to move the November 2024 Ƶ Board of Governors meeting from Nov. 21 to Nov. 14 because of a national conference scheduling conflict.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY SKILES to approve the claims, with the exception of payments to themselves, and also to approve the other consent items.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

PARNERSHIP/OWNERSHIP

Community and Workforce Education Report

Dr. Kelly Christensen introduced the following speakers:

  • Becky Fausett, adult education director, said the program is serving 2,268 students from 49 countries who speak 51 languages. Of these students, 80 percent are taking English as a second language classes and 20 percent are taking GED classes. The program has started enrolling the students at the same time, so they are part of a cohort that works together. The number of cohorts has varied from Ƶ location to location, but next year, all cohorts will begin in July and January.
  • Kara Greenwalt, student and enrollment services director, focused on the on-campus housing for full-time Ƶ students at the University of Nebraska-Kearney. For additional fees, they can also have a meal plan and parking permit and have access to counseling, the wellness center and student events. During the past year, the Kearney Center held 38 activities and events for current students and hosted 731 potential new students through individual visits, group tours and admissions events. Ƶ students used 746 food items and 568 hygiene items from the Kearney Food and Hygiene Pantry.
  • Katie Holmes, student services specialist, talked about the National Society of Leadership and Success, which is the country’s largest leadership honor society. Ƶ students involved in the organization learn how to discover and achieve their dreams through participation in leadership training, speaker broadcasts and networking teams.
  • Marni Danhauer, dean of community and workforce education, said the numbers continued to grow for workforce education, which includes nursing assistant, medication aide, industrial, advanced manufacturing design technology, leadership, and environmental health and safety classes. The department has 10 full-time trainers. The department is also seeing exploding enrollments in Early College classes, for which high school students can earn both high school and college credit.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

Scott Miller stated no one had signed in for Public Participation.

DISCUSSION OF CONSENT/ACTION ITEMS

Program Reviews

Drs. Candace Walton, Nate Allen and Sara Kort presented information on the diesel technology, media arts and medical laboratory technician programs, which are undergoing their seven-year review as required by the Nebraska Coordinating Commission for Postsecondary Education.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY BUSS to approve continuation of Ƶ’s diesel technology program.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to approve continuation of Ƶ’s media arts program.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

MOVED BY KELLER, SECONDED BY QUICK to approve continuation of Ƶ’s medical laboratory technician program.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Parental Leave

The college human resources department has recommended a parental leave policy be added as an employee benefit. This benefit would apply for both natural birth and adoption. In the past three years, 24 women and 10 men would have qualified for this benefit. If approved, the benefit would begin for staff members on July 1. For faculty members, the benefit can be considered during their next round of contract negotiations.

MOVED BY DAVIS, SECONDED BY KELLER to approve the new parental leave policy.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

REPORTS

Dr. Gotschall’s Report

Dr. Gotschall reported the following:

  • Great commencement activities this past week with over 500 students participating! Thanks to those able to attend in person and in spirit.
  • Continue with various budget meetings collegewide regarding changes to personnel wages, equipment, grant requests, supplies, travel and operations. Attended the pre-audit planning meeting. Overall budget coming together for tentative board approval at June meeting.
  • Transportation campaign leadership meetings and industry open house have been well received with positive progress being made on financial pledges, industry input and construction plans.
  • Attended the Beam Raising at the University of Nebraska-Kearney for the Rural Health complex with positive interactions with now University President Jeff Gold, retiring UNK Chancellor Kristensen and many of our community and legislative partners who were in attendance.
  • Attended two culinary student “final” meal events, attended the associate degree in nursing pinning ceremony for our 60 graduates and continued to reach out to my assigned “success coach” students who were completing the semester. Met with advisors planning the national SkillsUSA event for our 10 Ƶ students who qualified.
  • Watched the esports championships in which two of our teams won national championships.
  • Issued and signed contracts for faculty renewals, participated in several dean of student interviews, and held employee open forums in Hastings, Grand Island, Columbus and Area Office. Attended All-College Faculty Senate spring meeting.
  • Participated in two days of meetings with Holdrege community members seeking feedback on a possible relocation, conducted a local radio interview on the topic and met with possible donors.
  • Hosted a meeting with the State Chamber and Nebraska Economic Development regarding the Governor’s Regional Workforce Development initiative that the community colleges will be involved with along with over 100 community members across the Ƶ service area.
  • Attended American Association of Community Colleges, Higher Learning Commission and ASU+GSV conference on artificial intelligence and educational technologies in education. Shared reports of contacts and possible resources for our continued AI exposure for faculty and employees as well as updates on accreditation since we will be hosting site team in March 2025.
  • Interacted with some of the over 700 5th grades students who attended the Groundwater Festival on the Grand Island Campus this week.
  • Participated in the Crime House Open House and Chamber of Commerce Business After Hours celebration, as well as the Pirnie Inclusive Playground ribbon cutting, and a major donor visit in Kearney prior to the Buffalo County Economic Development annual meeting.
  • Attended the Grand Island and Columbus Chamber of Commerce annual meetings/banquets.
  • Attended Aksarben Annual Stakeholders Meeting and received notice of a $50,000 donation from Aksarben for scholarships for career/technical students at Ƶ.
  • Participated in the NCCA Phi Theta Kappa Academic All-State ceremony and lunch where the governor spoke and five students from Ƶ were recognized. Also participated in the quarterly NCCA board meeting and several community college president’s meetings. Participated in Grand Island Senior High’s apprenticeship signing ceremony and will be hosting a meeting in June with over a dozen area superintendents regarding continuation of our Nebraska Math Readiness grant initiative.
  • Attended Ƶ-Columbus Fine Arts Show and spring music concerts.
  • Participated in the Virtual Nebraska Manufacturing Roundtable meeting as well as minutes compilation for the Nebraska Manufacturing Advisory Council meeting. Ƶ-Columbus is hosting a statewide Future of Nebraska Manufacturing Conference on May 16.

The following reports were also submitted for board review:

  • Enrollment Report
  • Grants Report
  • Purchasing Report

EXECUTIVE SESSION

Pirnie requested an executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues after a short break at 2:36 p.m.

MOVED BY KELLER SECONDED BY BUSS that the Board of Governors recess the regular meeting in order to go into executive session to discuss personnel and legal issues.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie reconvened the regular session of the Board of Governors meeting at 2:50 p.m.

ADJOURNMENT

MOVED BY SKILES, SECONDED BY DAVIS to adjourn.

Aerni – absent
Borden – absent
Buss – aye
Cowan – absent
Davis – aye
Heiden – aye
Keller – aye
Novotny – absent
Pirnie – aye
Quick – aye
Skiles – aye

UNANIMOUS “AYE” VOTE – MOTION CARRIED

Pirnie declared the meeting adjourned at 2:51 p.m.